Articles

Great Advice for Wedding Planning

Flowers Bring on the Unique

by Emily Jane Cappiello

Flowers are one of the most important parts of a wedding. They are a focal point as the bridesmaids are walking down the aisle; they set the scene at the ceremony site either as décor or added with a little help from a flower girl and they help create the mood at the reception hall.

With the wedding market tied to the fashion market, individuality and customization are the newest trends in flowers. With colored bouquets to match or highlight bridesmaids dresses – which are in the season’s hottest shades – the flowers will also be on the cutting edge of style.

“Nothing is cookie-cutter anymore. Brides want something beautiful that represents who they are and what their personal style is,” said Melissa Stewart, owner and designer at Primrose Floral and Event Design in Lexington, Mass. Stewart said that romantic flowers such as peonies and garden roses are quite popular. They are a petal packed and have a lush feel. More contemporary brides, she said, have been opting for orchids.

In addition, loose, garden style bouquets or even a bit more rustic options have been popping up on a regular basis. In addition, brides are looking for touches to make their bouquets increasingly unique. “Brides are still trending towards the hand-tied bouquets, but they are looking for little details, such as fine detailing with trims and beading to make the handheld more unique. Sentimental items such as lockets, or the sash from her mother’s wedding gown. Within the bouquets, Mother Nature has given us some interesting things to work with like succulents, fruit, tree bark and seed pods,” Stewart said.

seasonal trends

Depending on the season, a bride may choose to use what is available or to import flowers to complete a certain look. By using the flowers that reflect the timeframe in which the wedding is taking place, it will be easier to customize the arrangements, as well as help keep wedding budgets on track. “Colors are not so black and white when it comes to being season specific. I had a lot of purples, plums, burgundy and greens this fall,” said Stewart.

Wedding flowers available all year-round include baby’s breath, bachelor’s button, calla lilies, carnations, delphiniums, gardenias, heather, lily of the valley, orchids, proteas, roses and scabiosas.

In the spring, florists can take advantage of using anemones, bells of Ireland, boronia, casablanca lily, daffodils, delphiniums, hyacinths, lilacs and peonies.

Summer is the height of the wedding season and bouquets can see arrangements of alstroemerias, chrysanthemums, English lavenders, forgetme- nots, freesia, gerbera daisies, as well as many other flowers. Speak with your florist about all the available options.

The fall has the smallest selection of flowers, but fall hues are usually a big hit. Flowers that can be used for a fall wedding include asters, chrysanthemums, dahlias, statices and zinnias.

Having a winter wedding? Flowers that can be easily added to your arrangements are bells of Ireland, camellias, casablanca lilies, cosmos, forget-me-nots, hollies, jasmines, poinsettias, lilies, Stars of Bethlehem, and sweet peas. Although, you aren’t tied to what is in bloom, said Stewart.

“The flower market has flowers coming from all over the world. While traditional peony season in the U.S. is May and June, they are also available in December and January. It gives floral designers more accessibility to being able to provide flowers that a bride may have her heart set on. It doesn’t work for everything, though,” she said.

color trends

“Brides are becoming more savvy and fashion focused. They stay on top of the fashion trends, even color and floral trends,” Stewart said. “Every year there seems to be a color that dominates, however, people are learning to use color palettes which makes for a more unique and eye catching event.”

According to Stewart, the spring color of 2012 is predicted to be a playful, tangerine color that has poppies written all over it. In addition, yellow and gray combinations have become very popular in the past few months, as well as soft, romantic colors.

Stewart also encourages her brides to feed off of the coloring of her surroundings to create a perfect floral complement for their special day. “Pick up on the color cues around you, such as gardens and landscaping, the sea, the blooming wisteria vine on the rustic arbor – things like that,” she said.

In addition, said Stewart, it doesn’t matter what season you are getting married in – you can pick what you love for your big day.

out of the ordinary

As an increasing number of brides are beginning to want more elaborate and non-traditional weddings, flowers will be finding their way into the mix.

Some of these new uses, according to Stewart: Creating blooming walls or panels to use as backdrops or spruce up a space that may need some color; hanging flowers; covering old chandeliers with flowers; hanging small, clear glass vases with flowers and/or candles to give the room a completely different ambiance and using flowers as artwork.

“Flowers do not have to be used in traditional vases or containers. Depending on the style of the wedding, you may have flowers being set in old watering cans, vintage suitcases, antique glassware, tea tins, terrariums, or boxes – there is no limit to what you can use,” she said.

not just flowers

In addition to traditional flowers, brides are also coming up with new and innovative ways to really create something special that is their own. Paper bouquets made by crafters are not only eye-catching, but they give the bride her own memento of the day to bring home.

“I think what makes our bouquets great is that they really represent the bride’s personality. Each collection is individually tailored to her vision,” said Amber Pitts, creator of Enchanted Bouquets, which makes paper bouquets. “Unlike traditional fresh flowers, she can have any colors she wants since the blooms are made of paper – there is no restriction here. If she wants neon green or purple polka dot roses, it’s easily done,” Pitts added.

Bouquets and centerpieces made from or dotted with antique pins are also a big hit right now. The pins bring a personal and sentimental touch, a sure way to ‘wow’ guests.

When it comes to picking your flowers, don’t get overwhelmed. Focus on what you love and work with your florist to make your vision come true. 

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Flowers are one of the most important parts of a wedding. They are a focal point as the bridesmaids are walking down the aisle; they set the scene at the ceremony site either as décor or added with a little help from a flower girl and they help create the mood at the reception hall.

With the wedding market tied to the fashion market, individuality and customization are the newest trends in flowers. With colored bouquets to match or highlight bridesmaids dresses – which are in the season’s hottest shades – the flowers will also be on the cutting edge of style.

“Nothing is cookie-cutter anymore. Brides want something beautiful that represents who they are and what their personal style is,” said Melissa Stewart, owner and designer at Primrose Floral and Event Design in Lexington, Mass. Stewart said that romantic flowers such as peonies and garden roses are quite popular. They are a petal packed and have a lush feel. More contemporary brides, she said, have been opting for orchids.

In addition, loose, garden style bouquets or even a bit more rustic options have been popping up on a regular basis. In addition, brides are looking for touches to make their bouquets increasingly unique. “Brides are still trending towards the hand-tied bouquets, but they are looking for little details, such as fine detailing with trims and beading to make the handheld more unique. Sentimental items such as lockets, or the sash from her mother’s wedding gown. Within the bouquets, Mother Nature has given us some interesting things to work with like succulents, fruit, tree bark and seed pods,” Stewart said.

seasonal trends

Depending on the season, a bride may choose to use what is available or to import flowers to complete a certain look. By using the flowers that reflect the timeframe in which the wedding is taking place, it will be easier to customize the arrangements, as well as help keep wedding budgets on track. “Colors are not so black and white when it comes to being season specific. I had a lot of purples, plums, burgundy and greens this fall,” said Stewart.

Wedding flowers available all year-round include baby’s breath, bachelor’s button, calla lilies, carnations, delphiniums, gardenias, heather, lily of the valley, orchids, proteas, roses and scabiosas.

In the spring, florists can take advantage of using anemones, bells of Ireland, boronia, casablanca lily, daffodils, delphiniums, hyacinths, lilacs and peonies.

Summer is the height of the wedding season and bouquets can see arrangements of alstroemerias, chrysanthemums, English lavenders, forgetme- nots, freesia, gerbera daisies, as well as many other flowers. Speak with your florist about all the available options.

The fall has the smallest selection of flowers, but fall hues are usually a big hit. Flowers that can be used for a fall wedding include asters, chrysanthemums, dahlias, statices and zinnias.

Having a winter wedding? Flowers that can be easily added to your arrangements are bells of Ireland, camellias, casablanca lilies, cosmos, forget-me-nots, hollies, jasmines, poinsettias, lilies, Stars of Bethlehem, and sweet peas. Although, you aren’t tied to what is in bloom, said Stewart.

“The flower market has flowers coming from all over the world. While traditional peony season in the U.S. is May and June, they are also available in December and January. It gives floral designers more accessibility to being able to provide flowers that a bride may have her heart set on. It doesn’t work for everything, though,” she said.

color trends

“Brides are becoming more savvy and fashion focused. They stay on top of the fashion trends, even color and floral trends,” Stewart said. “Every year there seems to be a color that dominates, however, people are learning to use color palettes which makes for a more unique and eye catching event.”

According to Stewart, the spring color of 2012 is predicted to be a playful, tangerine color that has poppies written all over it. In addition, yellow and gray combinations have become very popular in the past few months, as well as soft, romantic colors.

Stewart also encourages her brides to feed off of the coloring of her surroundings to create a perfect floral complement for their special day. “Pick up on the color cues around you, such as gardens and landscaping, the sea, the blooming wisteria vine on the rustic arbor – things like that,” she said.

In addition, said Stewart, it doesn’t matter what season you are getting married in – you can pick what you love for your big day.

out of the ordinary

As an increasing number of brides are beginning to want more elaborate and non-traditional weddings, flowers will be finding their way into the mix.

Some of these new uses, according to Stewart: Creating blooming walls or panels to use as backdrops or spruce up a space that may need some color; hanging flowers; covering old chandeliers with flowers; hanging small, clear glass vases with flowers and/or candles to give the room a completely different ambiance and using flowers as artwork.

“Flowers do not have to be used in traditional vases or containers. Depending on the style of the wedding, you may have flowers being set in old watering cans, vintage suitcases, antique glassware, tea tins, terrariums, or boxes – there is no limit to what you can use,” she said.

not just flowers

In addition to traditional flowers, brides are also coming up with new and innovative ways to really create something special that is their own. Paper bouquets made by crafters are not only eye-catching, but they give the bride her own memento of the day to bring home.

“I think what makes our bouquets great is that they really represent the bride’s personality. Each collection is individually tailored to her vision,” said Amber Pitts, creator of Enchanted Bouquets, which makes paper bouquets. “Unlike traditional fresh flowers, she can have any colors she wants since the blooms are made of paper – there is no restriction here. If she wants neon green or purple polka dot roses, it’s easily done,” Pitts added.

Bouquets and centerpieces made from or dotted with antique pins are also a big hit right now. The pins bring a personal and sentimental touch, a sure way to ‘wow’ guests.

When it comes to picking your flowers, don’t get overwhelmed. Focus on what you love and work with your florist to make your vision come true. 

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